Developing the Principles of Parental Mental Health in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU)

Authors

1 Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Modeling in Health Research Center, Shahrekord University of Medical Sciences, Shahrekord, Iran

2 Department of neonatology, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran

Abstract

Background: Hospitalization of infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) may disrupt the proper interaction with infants and lead to anxiety and depression, while adversely affecting the role of families. Therefore, it is necessary for healthcare teams to be familiar with the principles of parental mental health in the NICU. The present study aimed to codify the principles of parental mental health in the NICU. Methods: This study was conducted with a triangulation methodology in two steps. In the first step, the principles of mental health care for parents in the NICU were compiled and translated. In the second step, the principles were edited using the Delphi method based on the opinion of experts (physicians, faculty members, and health policymakers). Final principles of parental mental health in the NICU were codified. Results: In total, four general principles of holistic care, relationship with parents in the NICU, special care for establishing communication with families in the NICU, and principles of infants and family care were obtained.
Conclusion: Since healthcare teams may not be familiar with the principles of parental mental health in the NICU, the results of the present study could lay the groundwork for promoting the knowledge of healthcare team members in interaction with parents

Keywords


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