Comparison of the Therapeutic Effects of Bubble CPAP and Ventilator CPAP on Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Premature Neonates

Authors

1 Premature Neonates Research Center, Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran

2 Department of Pediatrics, Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran

3 Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran

4 Department of Occupational Medicine, Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran

Abstract

Background: Respiratory distress syndrome is one of the main complications associated with low birth weight, and a main cause of mortality in premature neonates. The present study aimed to compare the efficacy of ventilator continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) and bubble CPAP in the treatment of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in premature neonates. Methods: This randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted on 119 neonates diagnosed with RDS, with the gestational age of 28-34 weeks and birth weight of 1000-2200 grams, who were admitted in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Infants were allocated to two groups of ventilator CPAP (VCPAP) and bubble CPAP (BCPAP) therapy. Results: Mean weight, gestational age, and one-minute Apgar score were not significantly different between the two groups. However, duration of treatment with mechanical ventilation in the BCPAP group was significantly lower compared to the VCPAP group. In addition, frequency of complications had no significant difference between the two groups. Conclusion: In the treatment of RDS, duration of mechanical ventilation was lower in the BCPAP group compared to the VCPAP group in premature neonates

Keywords


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