Initiation of the Neurally Adjusted Ventilatory Assist Mode in the Neonatal Period in Iran

Document Type: Case Report

Authors

1 MD, Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, School of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Children’s Medical Center, Tehran, Iran.

2 MSN, Department of Neonatal Intensive Care Nursing and Midwifery, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran

3 MD, Assistant Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, School of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Children’s Medical Center, Tehran, Iran

4 MD, Fellow of Pediatric Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, School of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Children’s Medical Center, Tehran, Iran

Abstract

Abstract:
The new neonatal ventilation methods have been developed along with utilization of new technological tools.This device is synchronized with the patient’s respiratory efforts. The ideal synchronized breath needs to be synchronous with initiation, size, and termination of the breath without delay in detecting of initial resiratory effort by device .The synchrony of respiration contributes to effective ventilation, therefore increase tidal volume and decrease complications. Neurally Adjusted Ventilatory Assist (NAVA) has been emerged as an innovative technology which gives the patient full control of timing and performance of the respiratory cycle of ventilator breath without gross delay. The electrical activity of the diaphragm (Edi) signal is filtered, amplified, digitalized, and then transmitted to the ventilator unit where it serves as a novel trigger for the mechanical breath. The ventilator assists the spontaneous breath by delivering a proportional pressure on a breath -by- breath basis. Then the synchrony of mechanical respirations with patient respirations contributes to effective ventilation and increase tidal volume and decrease complications. In this way, weaning is easier and faster. We review the first neonate in Iran who received this method of respiratory assistance devices and has been weaned easily in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) of the Children’s Medical Center.

Keywords


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