Comparison of bilirubin level in term infants born by vaginal delivery and C/S

Document Type: Original Article

Authors

1 - Assistant professor of neonatal diseases, Pediatric Department, Imam Reza Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, IRAN.

2 Associated professor Obstetrics and Gynecology, Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Imam Reza Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, IRAN.

3 Radiology Resident, Radiology Department, Imam Reza Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, IRAN.

4 Obstetrics and Gynecology Resident, Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Imam Reza Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, IRAN.

5 Professor of Neonatal Diseases, Pediatric Department, Imam Reza Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran

6 Associate Professor of Neonatal Diseases, Pediatric Department, Imam Reza Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran

Abstract

Background: Given the overriding importance of neonatal jaundice and scarcity of studies on the role of route of delivery on its occurrence, this study aimed to investigate the association between neonatal bilirubin level and the route of delivery (i.e., normal vaginal delivery [NVD] and cesarean section [CS]).
Methods: This prospective, cross-sectional study was conducted in 2012 in Imam Reza Hospital of Mashhad, Iran, 2012. In all term infants, who met the inclusion criteria, serum bilirubin level was measured by the bili-test device between the second and seventh days after birth. In cases with skin bilirubin level>5 mg/dl, serum bilirubin was also checked. The collected data were analyzed using SPSS, version 16.
Results: A total of 182 neonates were enrolled in the study, 56% of whom were male. The mean bilirubin levels in the NVD and CS groups were 9.4±2.9 mg/dl and 9.8±3.4 mg/dl, respectively (P=0.53). Additionally, comparison of the mean bilirubin levels between the two groups based of demographic characteristics demonstrated no significant differences.
Conclusion: This study showed no significant correlation between neonatal jaundice in term infants and the route of delivery.

Keywords


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